The practical impact of immigration reform

FLAGSometimes the debate surrounding immigration reform can become so heated and incorporate so much in the way of rhetoric, that the practical impact of such reform often gets lost in the mix – issues such as the effect that immigration reform would have on taxes, jobs and even drug smuggling.

Many of these questions simply do not have known answers, or can only be guessed at by researchers, lawmakers and advocates on either side of the argument.  However, with the possibility of immigration reform growing more immediate, more people are attempting to try and get a better grasp of just what the impact of the proposed legislation would really be, and those effects are among the most contentious parts of the debate.

One very powerful lobby group that is insistent on immigration reform taking place – and as soon as possible – is the US Chamber of Commerce.  “We’re determined to make 2014 the year that immigration reform is finally enacted,” said Thomas J Donahue, the chief executive officer of the Chamber, in a recent speech.  Given that the biggest coalition of businesses in the United States is putting its weight behind the attempt to reform the country’s immigration system would certainly seem to suggest that the coalition at least believes that it would be in the best interest of the nation’s economy.

One of the other hot topics in the immigration debate is drug smuggling, with an Iowa State Daily article noting that it is impossible to completely end drug smuggling but that sensible immigration reform could depress the market to a certain extent.